92 Tristan's Tip : Doer vs. Achiever

On the twenty-third installment of Tristan's Tips, our special guest Tristan Layfield (@LayfieldResume) talks about the difference between being perceived as a doer versus as an achiever at work. He also shares a few tips on how to stand out as the latter rather than the former.

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TRANSCRIPT

Tristan: What's going on, y'all? It's Tristan of Layfield Resume Consulting, and I've teamed up with Living Corporate to bring you all a weekly career tip. Have you ever heard of your resume painting you as more of a doer rather than an achiever? If so, you probably were like, "But what does that really mean?" Well, when it comes to writing the description for both your resume and LinkedIn profile, you have to be cognizant of the picture you're painting. Are you painting the picture of a doer, a person who completes a task, or an achiever, someone who doesn't just get the task done, but drives results? All too often we're painting ourselves out to simply be doers. See, many companies are looking to our previous work history as an indicator of what their return in investment in us can be. It's essential that we show them what we did, not just tell them, and the way that we do that is by highlighting the results and accomplishments we've had while in those roles. In order to switch up the narrative, start adding in numbers, metrics, and outcomes. These help illustrate the value you brought to your organization while in that role. So instead of saying you managed a team, say you oversaw a five-person marketing team. Instead of saying you exceeded the sales goals, say you exceeded monthly sales goals on average by 15%. Adding in that information can sometimes be a little hard. That's why I always suggest keeping a career journal, where you can write down your highlights to use later in resumes, LinkedIn profiles, and cover letters. If you need some help figuring out what you can include now, request a copy of your performance reviews. You or your boss more than likely put a few things in there that you can use. And remember that realistic estimates, not lies, are acceptable if necessary. Just try to be as accurate as possible and consistent whenever you speak about it. This tip was brought to you by Tristan of Layfield Resume Consulting. Check us out on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @LayfieldResume, or connect with me, Tristan Layfield, on LinkedIn.

Living Corporate