51 Tristan's Tip : Career Coaches

On the third installment of Tristan's Tips, our special guest Tristan Layfield discusses a personal expertise of his: career coaching. He also tells us which three questions we should ask ourselves before we pursue a career coach. Check back next Tuesday for another tip!

Tristan's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tristanlayfield/

Layfield Resume Consulting: https://layfieldresume.com/

Layfield Resume social media: IGTwitterFacebook

TRANSCRIPT

Tristan: What's going on, Living Corporate fam? It's Tristan from Layfield Resume Consulting, and I've teamed up with Living Corporate to bring you all another weekly career tip. So today let's discuss career coaches. The first career coaching firms started back in 1946. Back then and through the '80s, career coaching was largely reserved for CEOs and executives, and career support for workers lower in the ranks typically took the form of apprenticeships. By the time millennials got into the workforce all of that was gutted, and we were left to figure out our careers on our own. Now, fast forward to today, and the times have definitely changed. There are companies now that provide their employees career coaches on day one, not necessarily so they can figure out their next step but so they can make the most of their current step. With job searching becoming increasingly difficult, career coaches like myself have risen to the occasion to try and assist job seekers and navigating them. Now that coaching is on the rise, it's imperative that we have a discussion around who should seek out a coach and why you should be selective about the coach you decide to work with. If you think you need a career coach, you more than likely do, but there are a few questions you need to ask yourself. #1: Do I understand that a career coach won't do all the work for me? #2: Am I ready to put in work to obtain the career I want? And #3: Do I have the budget to work with a coach? If you answered no to any of those questions, odds are you aren't ready for a career coach just yet. Think about a career coach like a basketball coach. They don't play the game, but they help you practice and give you all the tools you need to win. In order for you to take your game to the next level, you have to be zoned in, and you have to be ready to invest in yourself to get there. Most coaches are going to take you through a process that requires Dedication with a capital D. If you aren't ready to execute on your goals, then more than likely you aren't ready for a coach just yet. Also, remember that all coaches do not have the same methods and every coach is not for every person. You should do your research on your coach. Google them, take advantage of any free consultation or exploration calls, and if you want to go further, don't be afraid to ask for a client reference. Believe me, any good coach is vetting you just as much and should encourage you to assess if you all are a fit. After all, you're spending money, and they're spending time, and I'm sure neither one of you want to waste those precious resources. This tip was brought to you by Tristan of Layfield Resume Consulting. Check us out on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @LayfieldResume, or connect with me, Tristan Layfield, on LinkedIn.

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