219 Tristan’s Tip : What To Do If You Get Laid Off

On the sixty-third entry of Tristan’s Tips, our amazing host Tristan Layfield talks to us about what to do if we get laid off. Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, over 26.5 million Americans have filed for unemployment. We are seeing numbers that we haven’t seen since the Great Depression. Losing your job is never an easy thing to go through, but remember that there is nothing to be ashamed about. This is only a small part of your story and it won’t last forever!

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TRANSCRIPT

Tristan: What’s going on, Living Corporate?! It’s Tristan of Layfield Resume Consulting, and I’m back to bring you another career tip. This week I want to talk to you about what to do if you get laid off.

Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic over 26.5 million Americans have filed for unemployment. We are seeing numbers that we haven’t seen since the Great Depression. To some degree, we all knew that companies could eliminate our positions, but this has become a reality for far too many people who didn’t expect it. So let’s discuss the steps you should take if you have been or get laid off.

First, grieve and take a moment to deal with your emotions. We’re human; we’re going to feel some type of way after we’ve been laid off. If you don’t take some time to feel your feels, they will come back to bite you at some point.

Second, file for unemployment and deal with your finances. Some people may cringe at this, but in times like these, we have to let go of our egos and do what’s best to keep us on our feet. Though it’s not a full paycheck, it will help you keep some money in your account while you search for the next opportunity. Plus right now in the US, you will get an extra $600 per week in unemployment due to the pandemic. Also, be sure to take a look at your bills to see what you can but back on like different subscription services. When it comes to utilities and other bills, make sure to call companies because many of them are waiving or delaying payments with no penalty at this time.

Third, do some market reach to understand what companies are hiring and what type of roles are out there. I know it may not seem like it, but there are still tons of employers who need the talent and skillsets you will bring to the table. This will also help you figure out what next step you might want to make in your career. Doing this research upfront will help you with some of the other tasks as well.

Next, update your resume and LinkedIn. Really focus on your transferrable skillsets that relate to the roles you identified in the step before. Also, be sure to highlight your ability to leverage and adapt to new technology as this is something most companies are contending with right now. On your LinkedIn profile, be sure to turn on the job-seeking settings including “Open for New Opportunities.” This can help you be seen by recruiters and hiring managers on the platform.

Then I’d suggest you start building your network. Of course, you want to do this virtually now utilizing LinkedIn, email, Zoom, and other tools. But this step is essential. Even though more companies will be turning to their job postings to help fill roles, those will be very competitive and we know that referrals are the most proven way to land a role. Do some research and target people one to two levels above where you want to go because they’re going to be the decision-makers. Make sure while you’re cultivating these relationships that you stay focused on where you can provide value to the person that you want to help you.

After that, start acquiring new skills. Once we get on the other side of this pandemic, there will be an influx of new opportunities. Prepare yourself by taking some online courses or certifications so you can ensure you will be considered as a highly qualified candidate.

Lastly, try your hardest to maintain a positive mindset and attitude. I know it’s easier said than done, but stress and anxiety not only have a negative effect on your health but also your job search. So make sure you’re taking care of yourself and doing things that bring you joy. Reach out and talk to someone. And remember to be patient with yourself and the process.

Losing your job is never an easy thing to go through, but remember that there is nothing to be ashamed about. This is only a small part of your story and it won’t last forever.

This tip was brought to you by Tristan of Layfield Resume Consulting. Check us out on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook @LayfieldResume or connect with me, Tristan Layfield, on LinkedIn.

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